Nearby Attractions

Nearby Attractions

Thermal Valley

Located beside Beitou Hot Spring Park, Thermal Valley is one of the sources supplying the area’s hot springs. The sulfuric steam that blankets the valley year-round gives the valley a frightening quality, giving rise to nicknames like “Ghost Lake.” The springs here have the highest temperatures of any in the Datunshan volcano group. With its surreal sulfuric atmosphere, it’s no wonder Thermal Valley was considered one of the “12 great sights of Taiwan” during the Period of Japanese Occupation!

The “Beitou rocks” (aka Hokutolite or Anglesobarite) in Thermal Valley contain the radioactive element radium. Out of the many thousands of minerals existing in the world, they are the only ones named after a place in Taiwan, and can be found in only two places: Beitou and Tamagawa, Japan. In recent years, the “Beitou Rock Conservation Area” has been established to ensure the protection of these natural rarities. Thus, when visiting Thermal Valley, you not only get to experience “hell” but also gain insight into some rare radioactive rocks!


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Puji Temple

Situated on Wenquan Road in Beitou District, Puji Temple is one of the few surviving Japanese-era Buddhist temples in Taiwan. It was built in 1905 with donations from railway workers and was known as Tesshin-in. Today, the temple is dedicated to Guanyin, who is locally considered to be the guardian spirit of the hot springs. In 1998, the temple was designated as an official historic site. The Japanese aesthetics of the temple are evident in the tranquil simplicity and sober design. The Japanese-style worship ceremony is continued to this day at the temple.


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瀧乃湯

This hot spring bath was built around 1907 and originally intended for the therapeutic benefit of Japanese soldiers during the Japanese occupation era.

After Taiwan’s liberation from Japan, the female bath was constructed with Qilian rock, the quarrying of which is banned. Both male and female springs are modest and simple in design, and bathers are naked. A stone monument in the center of the courtyard commemorates a visit from Japanese Crown Prince Showa.


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